Wednesday, September 14, 2011
bythegods:

Νύξ ; Nyx - Primordial Greek Goddess of NightRoman: NoxZeus the almighty god of the Greek Olympian Pantheon is depicted as all powerful. However, like every deity or hero there is always one thing (if not many) they fear. I’m not referring to an envious Hera, nor a tyrannical father like Kronos, or even the Gigantes who almost ransacked Olympus. There is one figure, in the obscure pages of Greek Mythology whom Zeus wishes to displease - one with the power over Gods and Mortals - Nyx the Goddess of Night.Origins: Nyx is depicted as a black-winged Goddess driving a chariot, and at times a veil of dark mist. Mentioned from the cosmogony of Hesiod, she was born from Air (Khaos). Sleeping  with Darkness (Erebos) produced Light (Aither) and Day (Hemera), first  components of the primeval universe. However, she gave birth to other more known but lesser gods which include [According to Hesiod]:
Thanatos (Gentle Death)
Hypnos (Sleep)
Morpheus & the tribe of dreams (Oneiroi)
Moirai (better known as the Fates)
Ker & the Keres (Bringers of violent death)
Moros - (Doom)
Oizys (Misery)
Momos (Criticism & Blame)
Hesperides (Nymphs of the Evenings)
Nemesis (Retribution)
Apate (Deceit)
Philotes (Sex - hence the the suffix -phile)
Geras (Old age - Geriatrics anyone?)
Eris (the most famous hater in the Universe of Greek mythology - Strife/Discord)
Though rarely mentioned in Greek Myths, one passage from the Iliad by Homer is a scene where Hypnos addresses Hera about an old favor she commanded of him:[Hypnos addresses Hera :] `That time I laid to sleep the brain in Zeus  of the aegis and drifted upon him still and soft, but your mind was  devising evil, and you raised along the sea the blasts of the racking  winds, and on these swept him away to Kos, the strong-founded, with all  his friends lost, but Zeus awakened in anger and beat the gods up and  down his house, looking beyond all others for me, and would have sunk me  out of sight in the sea from the bright sky had not Nyx (Night) who has  power over gods and men rescued me. I reached her in my flight, and  Zeus let be, though he was angry, in awe of doing anything to swift Nyx’  displeasure.’”
Zeus played it safe… and did a smart thing not to anger a Goddess far more powerful than he. So we have Nyx and her children to thank for many other events in Greek Mythology. E.g. Eris, spirit of discord, throwing the Golden Apple which influenced the start of the Trojan war, etc.
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Thanks for the awesome submission! This article wasn’t written by the regular editors, but submitted by a follower! If you’ve got a story you want to share, or a deity you really love, let us know! For more information on Nyx, go here. To submit your own articles to By the Gods!, click here!

bythegods:

Νύξ ; Nyx - Primordial Greek Goddess of Night
Roman: Nox

Zeus the almighty god of the Greek Olympian Pantheon is depicted as all powerful. However, like every deity or hero there is always one thing (if not many) they fear. I’m not referring to an envious Hera, nor a tyrannical father like Kronos, or even the Gigantes who almost ransacked Olympus. There is one figure, in the obscure pages of Greek Mythology whom Zeus wishes to displease - one with the power over Gods and Mortals - Nyx the Goddess of Night.

Origins: Nyx is depicted as a black-winged Goddess driving a chariot, and at times a veil of dark mist. Mentioned from the cosmogony of Hesiod, she was born from Air (Khaos). Sleeping with Darkness (Erebos) produced Light (Aither) and Day (Hemera), first components of the primeval universe. However, she gave birth to other more known but lesser gods which include [According to Hesiod]:

  • Thanatos (Gentle Death)
  • Hypnos (Sleep)
  • Morpheus & the tribe of dreams (Oneiroi)
  • Moirai (better known as the Fates)
  • Ker & the Keres (Bringers of violent death)
  • Moros - (Doom)
  • Oizys (Misery)
  • Momos (Criticism & Blame)
  • Hesperides (Nymphs of the Evenings)
  • Nemesis (Retribution)
  • Apate (Deceit)
  • Philotes (Sex - hence the the suffix -phile)
  • Geras (Old age - Geriatrics anyone?)
  • Eris (the most famous hater in the Universe of Greek mythology - Strife/Discord)

Though rarely mentioned in Greek Myths, one passage from the Iliad by Homer is a scene where Hypnos addresses Hera about an old favor she commanded of him:
[Hypnos addresses Hera :] `That time I laid to sleep the brain in Zeus of the aegis and drifted upon him still and soft, but your mind was devising evil, and you raised along the sea the blasts of the racking winds, and on these swept him away to Kos, the strong-founded, with all his friends lost, but Zeus awakened in anger and beat the gods up and down his house, looking beyond all others for me, and would have sunk me out of sight in the sea from the bright sky had not Nyx (Night) who has power over gods and men rescued me. I reached her in my flight, and Zeus let be, though he was angry, in awe of doing anything to swift Nyx’ displeasure.’

Zeus played it safe… and did a smart thing not to anger a Goddess far more powerful than he. So we have Nyx and her children to thank for many other events in Greek Mythology. E.g. Eris, spirit of discord, throwing the Golden Apple which influenced the start of the Trojan war, etc.

—-

Thanks for the awesome submission! This article wasn’t written by the regular editors, but submitted by a follower! If you’ve got a story you want to share, or a deity you really love, let us know! For more information on Nyx, go here. To submit your own articles to By the Gods!, click here!

(Source: bythegods)

silverwitch:

The Charge of the God
 
Listen to the words of the Great Father, who of old was called Osiris, Adonis, 
Zeus, Thor, Pan, Cernunnos, Herne, Lugh and by many other names:
 
“My Law is Harmony with all things.  Mine is the secret that opens the gates of 
life and mine is the dish of salt of the earth that is the body of Cernunnos 
that is the eternal circle of rebirth.  I give the knowledge of life 
everlasting, and beyond death I give the promise of regeneration and renewal. I 
am the sacrifice, the father of all things, and my protection blankets the 
earth.”
 
Hear the words of the dancing God, the music of whose laughter stirs the winds, 
whose voice calls the seasons:
 
“I who am the Lord of the Hunt and the Power of the Light, sun among the clouds 
and the secret of the flame, I call upon your bodies to arise and come unto me. 
For I am the flesh of the earth and all it’s beings. Thru me all things must die 
and with me are reborn.  Let my worship be in the body that sings, for behold 
all acts of willing sacrifice are my rituals.  Let there be desire and fear, 
anger and weakness, joy and peace, awe and longing within you.  For these too 
are part of the mysteries found within yourself, within me, all beginnings have 
endings, and all endings have beginnings.”
 

silverwitch:

The Charge of the God

 

Listen to the words of the Great Father, who of old was called Osiris, Adonis,

Zeus, Thor, Pan, Cernunnos, Herne, Lugh and by many other names:

 

“My Law is Harmony with all things.  Mine is the secret that opens the gates of

life and mine is the dish of salt of the earth that is the body of Cernunnos

that is the eternal circle of rebirth.  I give the knowledge of life

everlasting, and beyond death I give the promise of regeneration and renewal. I

am the sacrifice, the father of all things, and my protection blankets the

earth.”

 

Hear the words of the dancing God, the music of whose laughter stirs the winds,

whose voice calls the seasons:

 

“I who am the Lord of the Hunt and the Power of the Light, sun among the clouds

and the secret of the flame, I call upon your bodies to arise and come unto me.

For I am the flesh of the earth and all it’s beings. Thru me all things must die

and with me are reborn.  Let my worship be in the body that sings, for behold

all acts of willing sacrifice are my rituals.  Let there be desire and fear,

anger and weakness, joy and peace, awe and longing within you.  For these too

are part of the mysteries found within yourself, within me, all beginnings have

endings, and all endings have beginnings.”

 

Wednesday, August 31, 2011
druidteachings:

CONJURING THE DIVINE FEMININE
plants, minerals, oils for your altar

 APHRODITE
goddess of romantic and sexual love
olive blossoms, oyster shells, linden, red roses and sea foam 
 BASTETEgyptian Goddess of Cats & PerfumeryEgyptian red musk, catnip and warm amber
 BRIGIDCeltic Goddess of Fire green moss, verdant field greens, heather, bathwater, and coal
 CIRCEMaster Sorceress star anise, narcotic opium, aubergine, black tea,  ghost flower
CLEOPATRALegendary Queen, Seductress & StrategistEgyptian myrrh, sandalwood, red musk, and amyris 
COATLICUETerrifying Mother of the Moon and Stars
red banana, cumin, cacao, cinnamon and raw coffee beans
EPONA Horse Goddess
icelandic moss, apples, sweetgrass, braided leather
ERISKEGALSumerian Queen of the Underworldblack calla lilies, whole cloves, scarlet amber, lapis lazuli  
EVEBiblical Temptressred apples, green serpents, figs & fig leaves 
FREYANorse Goddess of Love & Witchcraftsilver birch bark, briar, campfire smoke, feathers, hawthorne, and mandrake root
HECATEGoddess of the Dark Moon & CrossroadsNight blooming jasmine, cypress and torchlight smoke, musk, mugwort
HELScandinavian Goddess of the Realms of Deathcharred oak, stinging nettles, patchouli, smoldering yew branches and decaying leaves 
ISISEgyptian Goddess of the Worldmyrrh, jasmine absolute, amaranth (velvet flower), white musk, moonlight, and honey
JOAN OF ARCWarrior Maiden of Orléans
red oak, meadowsweet, honeysuckle, white clover, and rosewood
LILLITHPrimal Femalebergamot, wood betony, wolfsbane, blackberry
NEPTHYSEgyptian Goddess of Darknesslunar water, african violet, myrrh, ambergris 
PERSEPHONE pomegranate, white daffodil, meltwater and cypress 
PHARAOH HATSHEPSUTEgyptian Queen Regnantriverwater, pacifistic frankincense, bloodroot, and spikenard
ST. THECLANoble Virgin
lily of the valley, peppermint, wildflower honey, quartz crystal, church incense, gooseberry
WHORE OF BABYLONburnt vanilla, champagne foam, orchid, pear blossom, sea water

druidteachings:

CONJURING THE DIVINE FEMININE

plants, minerals, oils for your altar

 APHRODITE

goddess of romantic and sexual love

olive blossoms, oyster shells, linden, red roses and sea foam

 BASTET
Egyptian Goddess of Cats & Perfumery
Egyptian red musk, catnip and warm amber

 BRIGID
Celtic Goddess of Fire
green moss, verdant field greens, heather, bathwater, and coal

 CIRCE
Master Sorceress

 star anise, narcotic opium, aubergine, black tea,  ghost flower

CLEOPATRA
Legendary Queen, Seductress & Strategist

Egyptian myrrh, sandalwood, red musk, and amyris

COATLICUE
Terrifying Mother of the Moon and Stars

red banana, cumin, cacao, cinnamon and raw coffee beans

EPONA
 Horse Goddess

icelandic moss, apples, sweetgrass, braided leather

ERISKEGAL
Sumerian Queen of the Underworld
black calla lilies, whole cloves, scarlet amber, lapis lazuli 

EVE
Biblical Temptress
red apples, green serpents, figs & fig leaves

FREYA
Norse Goddess of Love & Witchcraft
silver birch bark, briar, campfire smoke, feathers, hawthorne, and mandrake root

HECATE
Goddess of the Dark Moon & Crossroads
Night blooming jasmine, cypress and torchlight smoke, musk, mugwort

HEL
Scandinavian Goddess of the Realms of Death
charred oak, stinging nettles, patchouli, smoldering yew branches and decaying leaves

ISIS
Egyptian Goddess of the World
myrrh, jasmine absolute, amaranth (velvet flower), white musk, moonlight, and honey

JOAN OF ARC
Warrior Maiden of Orléans

red oak, meadowsweet, honeysuckle, white clover, and rosewood

LILLITH
Primal Female
bergamot, wood betony, wolfsbane, blackberry

NEPTHYS
Egyptian Goddess of Darkness
lunar water, african violet, myrrh, ambergris

PERSEPHONE
 pomegranate, white daffodil, meltwater and cypress

PHARAOH HATSHEPSUT
Egyptian Queen Regnant
riverwater, pacifistic frankincense, bloodroot, and spikenard

ST. THECLA
Noble Virgin

lily of the valley, peppermint, wildflower honey, quartz crystal, church incense, gooseberry

WHORE OF BABYLON
burnt vanilla, champagne foam, orchid, pear blossom, sea water

Saturday, August 20, 2011
witchyways:

manwitch92:

Yaay Pan :D

source?

witchyways:

manwitch92:

Yaay Pan :D

source?

Friday, August 19, 2011
in-the-middle-earth:

© Ashley Herrin

in-the-middle-earth:

© Ashley Herrin

(Source: tripoddiaries)

lucifelle:

Chickweed by Candice Chicorrydell

lucifelle:

Chickweed by Candice Chicorrydell

Tuesday, August 16, 2011
wingsforlashes:

 (by Seattle ✈ Dredge)